All posts by Sophie

Keep moving forward ... :)

Men do cry: one man’s experience of depression

An article on Guardian

pic credit: Dave Homer

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/feb/22/men-do-cry-depression-matt-haig-reasons-to-stay-alive

EXCERPTS

“ …It’s one of the deadliest diseases on the planet, often still shrouded in a sense of shame. And for men under 35, suicide following depression is now the leading cause of death. Novelist Matt Haig recounts his own experience of suicidal thoughts and the long path to recovery… “

“… I am not anti pill. I am pro anything that works and I know pills do work for a lot of people. There may well come a time where I take pills again. For now, I do what I know keeps me just about level. Exercise definitely helps me, as does yoga and absorbing myself in something or someone I love, so I keep doing these things. I suppose, in the absence of universal certainties, we are our own best laboratory. If you are a man or a woman with mental health problems, you are part of a very large and growing group. Many of the greatest and, well, toughest people of all time have suffered from depression. Politicians, astronauts, poets, painters, philosophers, scientists, mathematicians (a hell of a lot of mathematicians), actors, boxers, peace activists, war leaders, and a billion other people fighting their own battles. You are no less or more of a man or a woman or a human for having depression than you would be for having cancer or cardiovascular disease or a car accident.

So what should we do? Talk. Listen. Encourage talking. Encourage listening. Keep adding to the conversation. Stay on the lookout for those wanting to join in the conversation. Keep reiterating, again and again, that depression is not something you “admit to”, it is not something you have to blush about, it is a human experience. It is not you. It is simply something that happens to you. And something that can often be eased by talking. Words. Comfort. Support. It took me more than a decade to be able to talk openly, properly, to everyone, about my experience. I soon discovered the act of talking is in itself a therapy. Where talk exists, so does hope. …”

Why we need to talk about male suicide

Steph Slack – TEDx Talks

THE QUESTIONS WE NEED TO ASK ABOUT MALE SUICIDE

Steph believes talking saves lives. Having lost her uncle to suicide and supported close friends through suicidal ideation, her aim is to raise awareness of suicide prevention and help people to feel confident and comfortable in conversations about suicide.

https://tedxfolkestone.com/the-questions-we-need-to-ask-about-male-suicide/

Why more men than women die by suicide

pic credit: Nik Shiliahin on Unsplash

An article By Helene Schumacher 18th March 2019 on BBC

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190313-why-more-men-kill-themselves-than-women

EXCERPTS “…In the UK, the male suicide rate is its lowest since 1981 – 15.5 deaths per 100,000. But suicide is still the single biggest killer of men under the age of 45. And a marked gender split remains. For UK women, the rate is a third of men’s: 4.9 suicides per 100,000.

It’s the same in many other countries. Compared to women, men are three times more likely to die by suicide in Australia, 3.5 times more likely in the US and more than four times more likely in Russia and Argentina. WHO’s data show that nearly 40% of countries have more than 15 suicide deaths per 100,000 men; only 1.5% show a rate that high for women.”

Men are more likely to die of suicide than women. – This reality bothers me so much,

We, both men and women, together as a community must do something about it.

If you’re a man and you struggle , please join our FB group. It’s a small online community of amazing, compassionate people.

I am also going to start a section on our resource library WorkWithTheBrainYouHave dot com for men, depression, & suicide.

You are not alone 🤗

🌻 Sophie 💗

Yep, sounds about right 😁

Pic credit : serenasugarcube

Remember to take a deep breath, unclench and stretch your muscles, and relax your mind from time to time throughout the day.

Yes things can be stressful, but things always have a way of working out 🤗

🌻 Sophie 💕

You can’t pour from an empty cup

pic credit: twitter starbucks

I want to dedicate today for those strong, courageous, compassionate individuals who have a loved one with mental illness and at many times be their support person.

For those kind souls who are caring for a loved one who struggles with brain condition / mental illness ❤️

Remember to take care of yourself ❤️ 🤗
You have to put on your oxygen mask first –

selflove #selfcare #mentalhealthsupport #mentalhealth #mentalillness #caregiver #depressionsupport #depression #suicide #suicidalthoughts #bekind #starbucks

Today is March 30th, the World Bipolar Day.

The Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh

If you have Bipolar, please know that you are not alone. Having Bipolar can be hard (I’m having mixed episode as I’m writing this 😐), but it is manageable. Remember to be kind to yourself. And remember, no matter how difficult an episode is, it WILL last. Stay calm, take care of yourself, and wait until the storm ⛈pass. And the storm ☔️ WILL pass, my dear friends ❤️.

Hugs 🤗,

🌻 Sophie 💗

PS. World Bipolar Day is an international collaboration to bring awareness to those living with bipolar disorders and to fight the social stigma surrounding it. World Bipolar Day is celebrated each year on March 30, the birthday of artist Vincent Van Gogh who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder after his death. Source: Embark Behavioral Health. Check out the link, it has a clear, easy to understand explanation about Bipolar 1 and Bipolar 2.

I see your beauty 🦋 ❤️ 🤗

pic credit: HealthyPlace.com

Butterflies 🦋 can’t see their wings. They can’t see how beautiful they are, but everyone else can. People are like that.

Dear friends, having mental illness can be really difficult 😣 at times, and sometimes we can’t see our own beauty. We only see our scars. 😔

I am here to tell you that you are beautiful 🌻 🌟 💜. You a warrior 🛡, and the scars you have are battle scars; and that’s what makes you beautiful.

You are beautiful and you are strong.

🌻 Sophie 💗

Put on your oxygen mask first

Quoting Amy Batchelor (starts on min 5:30),

“You have to take care of yourself as well,

IT’S PUTTING ON YOUR OWN OXYGEN MASK FIRST.

… and that’s … my friends, being outside, in the nature, watching the sunrise with my dogs, just really intense self care…

It’s a gift for me to be strong and happy even if he’s really depressed.

I think my path is to be a truth teller.

And Brad is a truth teller. Trust the journey!

It’s gonna turn out okay. It’s gonna turn out great, actually …” (smile).

You have to put on your oxygen mask FIRST.

Amy Batchelor

If you have a loved one with depression, anxiety, or other brain conditions, sometimes it can be challenging. Unfortunately for many of us, we forget that we have to also take care of ourselves. It is vital to take care of ourselves because we can’t pour from an empty cup. Amy is the first person I heard saying that metaphor; the metaphor I always use to answer people who reached out to me about feeling burned out when caring for a loved one with mental illness.

We need to talk about male suicide

Excerpt from TEDx Talks

What would happen if we all went home and had conversations with the men in our lives about what they’re feeling and thinking? The answer to solving today’s male suicide crisis may be simply listening to the men in our lives.

At some point in your life you’ll probably be touched by male* suicide. It’s now the biggest killer of men under 45 in the UK with 12 men taking their own lives every day.

In her challenging TEDx talk, Steph Slack shares her personal story of how losing her uncle to suicide caused her to question how we react to men who experience suicidal thoughts.

Steph asks: what if we stop seeing having suicidal thoughts as something unusual, change our stereotypical expectations of men and instead, support men who have the courage to be vulnerable with us?


If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts or are in crisis, in the UK Samaritans operate a 24/7 helpline on 116 123 or CALM operate a helpline 5pm to midnight for men on 0800 585858.

*all those who identify as male.

We need to talk about male suicide | Steph Slack | TEDxFolkestone

Weight of gold – please watch this documentary

The Weight of Gold Documentary

EXCERPTS

The Weight of Gold is an HBO Sports documentary exploring the mental health challenges that Olympic athletes often face. The film comes during a time when the COVID-19 pandemic has postponed the 2020 Tokyo Games — the first such postponement in Olympic history — and greatly exacerbated mental health issues.

The film seeks to inspire discussion about mental health issues, encourage people to seek help, and highlight the need for readily available support. It features accounts from Olympic athletes who share their own struggles with mental health issues, including Michael Phelps, Apolo Ohno, Shaun White, Lolo Jones, Gracie Gold, Katie Uhlaender, Bode Miller, David Boudia, Jeremy Bloom, Sasha Cohen, and, posthumously, Steven Holcomb and Jeret “Speedy” Peterson (via his mother, Linda Peterson).